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Some great life changing tips from James Clear.



I came across James Clear from my tweet list. This guy is multi-talented and multi-faceted. He writes concise posts which hit the nail on the head often.
He usually writes about self-development and is really good at it. Every sentence is worth underlining ans emphasising.
His site JamesClear.com is worth the visit.
I have created a small list of the articles I liked with their gist.

http://jamesclear.com/failure-scientist
GIST : Treat failure like a scientist. Your failures are not you. Your successes are not you. They are simply data points that help guide the next experiment.

http://jamesclear.com/lay-a-brick
GIST : You can start small. You can focus on improving 1 percent each day. You can simply put in another rep.You don’t have to build everything you want today, but you do have to find a way to lay another brick.

http://jamesclear.com/identity-based-habits
GIST : In order to believe in a new identity, we have to prove it to ourselves. The goal is not to achieve results at first, the goal is to become the type of person who can achieve those things.
Want to gain more stamina?
Identity : Become a person who gains stamina to do reps and pushups everyday.
Small win : Perform reps and pushps everyday with 2 reps increased each day.
Add more such identities like open source developer, good programmer, good father, good husband. Add small wins to all such goals.
Best programmer at work.Person who blogs regularly.Person who earns extra income each month.
When you want to become better at something, proving your identity to yourself is far more important than getting amazing results. This is especially true at first.

http://jamesclear.com/stay-focused
GIST : It’s the ability to work when work isn’t easy that makes the difference.
All too often, we think our goals are all about the result. We see success as an event that can be achieved and completed.
It’s their commitment to the process. They fall in love with the daily practice, not the individual event.
Fall in love with boredom. Fall in love with repetition and practice. Fall in love with the process of what you do and let the results take care of themselves.

http://jamesclear.com/professionals-and-amateurs
GIST : The ability to show up everyday, stick to the schedule, and do the work — especially when you don’t feel like it — is so valuable that it is literally all you need to become better 99% of the time.
Being a pro is painful.
Professionals stick to the schedule, amateurs let life get in the way.
It means that you’re good at making time for what matters to you — especially when you don’t feel like it — instead of playing the role of the victim and letting life happen to you.
Setting a schedule doesn’t make you a professional, following it does.
For one week, do the things you want to do without letting life get in the way. Next week, start again.

http://jamesclear.com/are-you-living-an-urgent-life-or-an-important-one
GIST : Too often we live our lives based on what is urgent for us and not what is important to us. It’s dangerously easy to spend years constantly chasing the next urgent thing and never setting aside time to do what we know we should.
Nothing worth working for will ever seem urgent. That’s the nature of important goals. They don’t demand attention right now. They require a sense of purpose, a clear direction, and consistency over the long haul.
Pick one thing that’s important to you, set a specific goal for yourself, and get started today.
Never leave your dreams unfulfilled.

http://jamesclear.com/deliberate-practice
GIST : You can take the same approach to your work, to your goals, and to your legacy. By combining these two ideas — the consistency of “10 years of silence” and the focus of “deliberate[measurable] practice” — you can blow past most people.

http://jamesclear.com/marginal-gains
GIST : It’s so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making better decisions on a daily basis.By setting a schedule to never miss twice, you can prevent simple errors from snowballing out of control.
Success is a few simple disciplines, practiced every day; while failure is simply a few errors in judgment, repeated every day.
—Jim Rohn
There is power in small wins and slow gains. This is why average speed yields above average results. This is why the system is greater than the goal. This is why mastering your habits is more important than achieving a certain outcome.

http://jamesclear.com/haters
GIST : “You can either be judged because you created something or ignored because you left your greatness inside of you.”
The truth about criticism is that it’s almost always in your head.
And that brings us to the main point: it doesn’t matter what you do, there will always be someone who finds fault in it. So how do you get over it and move forward anyway?
Focus on the Road, Not the Wall
Criticism and negativity from other people is like a wall. And if you focus on it, then you’ll run right into it. You’ll get blocked by negative emotions, anger, and self-doubt. Your mind will go where your attention is focused. Criticism and negativity don’t prevent you from reaching the finish line, but they can certainly distract you from it.
Finally, and most importantly, make the choices that are right for you. People will criticize you either way.

http://jamesclear.com/stop-procrastinating-seinfeld-strategy
GIST : The Seinfeld Strategy works because it helps to take the focus off of each individual performance and puts the emphasis on the process instead. It’s not about how you feel, how inspired you are, or how brilliant your work is that day. Instead, it’s just about “not breaking the chain.”
Choose tasks that are simple to maintain and capable of producing the outcome you want.

And finally the most important article

http://jamesclear.com/goals-systems
GIST : If you completely ignored your goals and focused only on your system, would you still get results?
$$ Commit to a process, not a goal.
You can keep things simple and reduce stress by focusing on the daily process and sticking to your schedule, rather than worrying about the big, life-changing goals.
When you focus on the practice instead of the performance, you can enjoy the present moment and improve at the same time.
$$ Release the need for immediate results.
$$ Build feedback loops.
Goals can provide direction and even push you forward in the short-term, but eventually a well-designed system will always win. Having a system is what matters. Committing to the process is what makes the difference.

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